Radio Hosts Deliver Dismal Carrot Cake Report

Jannine Myers

The other day as I was driving to work, I heard on the radio a couple of FM broadcasters declaring their shock revelation of traditional cream cheese frosted carrot cakes containing as much as 854 calories per slice. Significantly more calories – and fat – than a McDonald’s Big Mac burger.

Carrot Cake

Calories: As many as 854 (with a whopping 480 calories from fat!)

Fat: 47g

Big Mac

Calories: 540 (260 of these calories from fat)

Fat: 29g

To put things into perspective, most major health and nutrition organizations consensually agree that daily fat intake be limited to no more than 30% of total daily calories. So, for a person on a 1500 calorie-per-day diet, total fat intake for the day should be no more than 50g. One slice of carrot cake however, adds up to almost the entire fat allowance for the day, not to mention more than half of the recommended daily calorie intake.

A further irony, given that carrot cakes are often seen as the healthier choice of cake, is that a slice of frosted chocolate cake typically has less than 300 calories and around 15g of fat. With those stats, you may as well go straight for the chocolate cake! Unless of course you prefer carrot cake, in which case you should most definitely indulge because it’s not like you eat carrot every single day (heck, where is the fun in life if you never let yourself enjoy a few indulgences).

For those of you however who are very health conscious and would prefer to “say no” to a calorie and fat laden slice of cake, you can always make your own slimmed-down version. After hearing the dismal news report mentioned above, I decided to head home after work and see what I could come up with by using only ingredients I already had on hand (I knew I already had carrots because I have a human rabbit in my house who eats her way through a kilo or two of carrots a week).

Here’s what I took from my pantry and refrigerator:

Bananas – 2 (medium, and very ripe)

Carrots – 2 (large)

Dates – 1/2 cup (dried and pitted)

Peanut Butter – about 1/4 to 1/3 cup (very oily)

Sugar – 1/3 cup

Almond milk – 1/3 cup (plain, unsweetened)

Chia seeds – 2 tbsps (soaked in 6 tbsps water)

Baking soda – 2 tsps (dissolved in a little almond milk)

Flour – 2 cups (plain)

Cinnamon – 1 tsp

Walnuts – 1/4 cup (chopped)

Salt – 1/4 tsp

Lemon – 1

Powdered sugar – 3/4 cup

Almond milk (extra – approx. 1 tbsp)

Directions:

Heat the oven to 175 C. Grease a rectangular baking pan and set aside.

First, soak the dates in hot boiling water, and set aside. Next, prepare two chia eggs by mixing the chia seeds in 6 tbsps of water and leaving to set for at least 5 minutes. Finally, grate the carrots and put aside. Now you’re ready to start baking.

In a medium bowl, mix together the flour, sugar, salt, and cinnamon.

In a blender, add the two bananas, the peanut butter with as much oil as possible, and the dates (with about 1/4 of the amount of water that they were soaking in – the rest can be disposed of). Pulse until just combined; the texture should be wet but slightly lumpy. Add the baking soda (already dissolved in a little almond milk), and then pour the wet mixture into the dry ingredients. Finally, add the chia eggs and walnuts. Gently mix everything together until the flour can no longer be seen. Pour into the cake pan and bake in the oven for approximately 20 minutes.

While the cake is baking, make a lemon powdered glaze by simply mixing together the juice of one lemon with 3/4 cup powdered sugar, and adding a little almond milk until a runny glaze-like consistency is achieved. When the cake comes out of the oven and has cooled a little, poke holes in the surface and pour the glaze all over. Then leave the cake to completely cool before slicing.

The end result is a health-ier lemon-glazed carrot cake with not-so-alarming nutrition stats:

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Makes 20 servings (20 slices)
Serving Size 1 slice / Amount Per Serving:

Calories 140 (calories from fat – 35)

Total Fat 3.65g (saturated fat .0.6g)

 

A Bread You Can Make With Just 3 Ingredients

Jannine Myers

I was recently browsing the site of an acquaintance (Tully Zander) and came across an easy bread recipe she shared. It’s so easy in fact, that it contains just three ingredients. Which, by the way, reminded me of a post I published a few years back when I was living in a US military community and shocked by the breads available in the base commissaries. Some of the more widely purchased breads, unbeknownst to those buying and consuming them, contained an ingredient list a mile long (not kidding; read my post).

Here in New Zealand, the breads generally contain far less ingredients, and supposedly non-harmful emulsifiers (used to enhance flavour and preserve shelf life), but if you don’t mind baking and would prefer to make your own bread, there are many safe and simple recipes online that even your kids would have no trouble following.

This one below, is my “slightly tweaked” version of Tully’s easy bread recipe. It’s the same essentially, except that I made it not only dairy-free but gluten-free as well. Although not as soft in texture as Tully’s recipe, I am sure that a little experimentation of flour and liquid amounts, as well as time spent kneading the dough, could potentially fix that.

I have been eating my bread toasted and I love it! It actually brings back childhood memories of weekend breakfasts, when almost every dairy in NZ sold freshly baked white bread loaves on Sunday mornings. Mum would send my brother and I out to buy a couple of loaves, and we’d devour them with butter and our favourite spreads (along with our cups of hot milo).

Nothing quite compares with the smell and taste of the breads back then, but give this recipe a try; it sounds bland and boring with so few ingredients but I think you’ll be surprised.

A favourite combo of peanut butter and banana

A favourite combo of mine: peanut butter and banana – and served with hot tea or coffee….sooooo good!

Ingredients:

4 cups gluten free flour

2 tsps yeast

1 1/3 cups non-dairy milk (or water)

Directions:

In a large bowl mix together the flour and yeast, and form a well in the bottom.

Pour in your choice of non-dairy milk (or water, for a lighter, fluffier bread), and gently combine until the flour and yeast absorbs it all.

Now you can begin to work on your dough. Knead it into a large ball and place on a floured surface. Do this for approximately five minutes or until it becomes smooth and a bit sticky. Resist the temptation to add additional flour, unless it’s so moist that it won’t combine. Alternately, if it’s too dry, add more milk or water, just a little at a time.

Once that’s done, lightly dust some flour on the top of your dough, place in a bowl and cover it with a kitchen towel. Let it sit in a warm, dry place and allow it to rise for an hour (or until it doubles in size).

Return the dough back onto your working surface and gently flatten it. Knead it some more to get rid of the excess air bubbles, and start shaping it into a loaf by repeatedly folding it on itself and rolling it.

Place your dough into a lightly greased loaf pan and cover again with a kitchen towel. Allow to sit for a further hour.

Allow the dough to rise by setting it in a warm, dry place for an hour or so

Allow the dough to rise by setting it in a warm, dry place for about an hour.

Towards the last few minutes of the previous step, preheat the oven to 180 C. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until golden. If you are unsure, perform a quick tap test and check that it sounds hollow.

Let the bread cool for 5 to 10 minutes before you turn it out onto a wire rack. Best eaten while still warm from the oven, or toasted.

[This bread stores well in an air-tight container kept in the refrigerator, and you can slice and freeze it too if you want to save for later]